Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Front Neuroendocrinol. 2012 Apr;33(2):127-39. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2012.01.002. Epub 2012 Jan 28.

Feed-forward mechanisms: addiction-like behavioral and molecular adaptations in overeating.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 593, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden. ja476@cam.ac.uk

Abstract

Food reward, not hunger, is the main driving force behind eating in the modern obesogenic environment. Palatable foods, generally calorie-dense and rich in sugar/fat, are thus readily overconsumed despite the resulting health consequences. Important advances have been made to explain mechanisms underlying excessive consumption as an immediate response to presentation of rewarding tastants. However, our understanding of long-term neural adaptations to food reward that oftentimes persist during even a prolonged absence of palatable food and contribute to the reinstatement of compulsive overeating of high-fat high-sugar diets, is much more limited. Here we discuss the evidence from animal and human studies for neural and molecular adaptations in both homeostatic and non-homeostatic appetite regulation that may underlie the formation of a "feed-forward" system, sensitive to palatable food and propelling the individual from a basic preference for palatable diets to food craving and compulsive, addiction-like eating behavior.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22305720
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk