Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Jul;222(2):269-76. doi: 10.1007/s00213-012-2642-z.

Assessing the effects of chronic sazetidine-A delivery on nicotine self-administration in both male and female rats.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Box 104790, Durham, NC 27710, USA.



Sazetidine-A is a selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent and partial agonist. It has been shown in previous studies to significantly reduce nicotine self-administration in rats after acute or repeated injections. However, the effects of continuous chronic infusions of sazetidine-A on maintenance of nicotine self-administration and relapse after abstinence have yet to be examined.


This study evaluated the efficacy of continuous sazetidine-A infusions (sc) over a period of 4 weeks to reduce nicotine self-administration in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats.


Sazetidine-A was administered via Alzet osmotic minipumps to young adult female and male rats at doses of 0, 2 or 6 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. The effects of sazetidine-A on IV nicotine self-administration were examined in repeated 3-h sessions over the first 2 weeks of infusion followed by 1 week of forced abstinence from nicotine and 1 week of resumed nicotine access.


The 6 mg/kg/day sazetidine-A dose significantly reduced overall nicotine self-administration compared with vehicle control across the sessions for both male (p < 0.001) and female (p < 0.05) rats. The lower 2 mg/kg/day sazetidine-A infusion dose was effective in reducing nicotine self-administration for male (p < 0.001), but not female rats. No attenuation in sazetidine-A effectiveness was seen over the course of the 4-week treatment. In the vehicle control group, male rats self-administered significantly (p < 0.001) more nicotine than females.


The continuing effectiveness of sazetidine-A in reducing nicotine self-administration in both male and female rats supports its promise as a new treatment to help people successfully quit smoking.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk