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Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2012 May;39(5):792-9. doi: 10.1007/s00259-011-2055-y.

Dynamic FDG PET for assessing early effects of cerebral hypoxia and resuscitation in new-born pigs.

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  • 1Department of Paediatric Research, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, PO Box 4950, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. charlotte.de.lange@rr-research.no

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism may be an early prognostic indicator of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury. In this study dynamic ¹⁸F-FDG PET was used to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolism in piglets after global perinatal hypoxia and the impact of the resuscitation strategy using room air or hyperoxia.

METHODS:

New-born piglets (n = 16) underwent 60 min of global hypoxia followed by 30 min of resuscitation with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO₂) of 0.21 or 1.0. Dynamic FDG PET, using a microPET system, was performed at baseline and repeated at the end of resuscitation under stabilized haemodynamic conditions. MRI at 3 T was performed for anatomic correlation. Global and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRgl) were assessed by Patlak analysis for the two time-points and resuscitation groups.

RESULTS:

Global hypoxia was found to cause an immediate decrease in cerebral glucose metabolism from a baseline level (mean ± SD) of 21.2 ± 7.9 to 12.6 ± 4.7 μmol/min/ 100 g (p <0.01). The basal ganglia, cerebellum and cortex showed the greatest decrease in CMRgl but no significant differences in global or regional CMRgl between the resuscitation groups were found.

CONCLUSION:

Dynamic FDG PET detected decreased cerebral glucose metabolism early after perinatal hypoxia in piglets. The decrease in CMRgl may indicate early changes of mild cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia. No significant effect of hyperoxic resuscitation on the degree of hypometabolism was found in this early phase after hypoxia. Cerebral FDG PET can provide new insights into mechanisms of perinatal hypoxic- ischaemic injury where early detection plays an important role in instituting therapy.

PMID:
22297457
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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