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BMC Health Serv Res. 2012 Jan 31;12:26. doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-12-26.

Patients' experiences of the quality of long-term care among the elderly: comparing scores over time.

Author information

  • 1TRANZO, Scientific Centre for care and welfare, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Tilburg University, the Netherlands. m.zuidgeest@casema.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Every two years, long-term care organizations for the elderly are obliged to evaluate and publish the experiences of residents, representatives of psychogeriatric patients, and/or assisted-living clients with regard to quality of care. Our hypotheses are that publication of this quality information leads to improved performance, and that organizations with substandard performance will improve more than those whose performance is relatively good.

METHODS:

The analyses included organizational units that measured experiences twice between 2007 (t(0)) and 2009 (t(1)). Experiences with quality of care were measured with Consumer Quality Index (CQI) questionnaires. Besides descriptive analyses (i.e. mean, 5(th) and 95(th) percentile, and 90% central range) of the 19 CQI indicators and change scores of these indicators were calculated. Differences across five performance groups (ranging from 'worst' to 'best') were tested using an ANOVA test and effect sizes were measured with omega squared (ω(2)).

RESULTS:

At t0 experiences of residents, representatives, and assisted-living clients were positive on all indicators. Nevertheless, most CQI indicators had improved scores (up to 0.37 change score) at t(1). Only three indicators showed a minor decline (up to -0.08 change score). Change scores varied between indicators and questionnaires, e.g. they were more profound for the face-to-face interview questionnaire for residents in nursing homes than for the other two mail questionnaires (0.15 vs. 0.05 and 0.04, respectively), possibly due to more variation between nursing homes on the first measurement, perhaps indicating more potential for improvement. A negative relationship was found between prior performance and change, particularly with respect to the experiences of residents (ω(2) = 0.16) and assisted-living clients (ω(2) = 0.15). However, the relation between prior performance and improvement could also be demonstrated with respect to the experiences reported by representatives of psychogeriatric patients and by assisted-living clients. For representatives of psychogeriatric patients, the performance groups 1 and 2 ([much] below average) improved significantly more than the other three groups (ω(2) = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Both hypotheses were confirmed: almost all indicator scores improved over time and long-term care organizations for the elderly with substandard performance improved more than those with a performance which was already relatively good.

PMID:
22293109
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3305532
Free PMC Article
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