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Pediatr Res. 2012 Jan;71(1):77-84. doi: 10.1038/pr.2011.17.

The effects of aggressive vs. conservative phototherapy on the brainstem auditory evoked responses of extremely-low-birth-weight infants.

Author information

  • 1Center for Clinical Research and Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA. Robert.E.Lasky@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study was a two-center, stratified, parallel-group randomized trial comparing the effects of aggressive vs. conservative phototherapy on brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) latencies in infants with extremely low birth weight (ELBW, ≤ 1,000 g).

RESULTS:

BAER latencies of 751-1,000 g birth-weight infants were shorter by 0.37 ms (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.02, 0.73) for wave V, 0.39 ms (0.08, 0.70) for wave III, and 0.33 ms (0.01, 0.65) for wave I after aggressive phototherapy at one center. Interwave intervals did not differ significantly. Similar nonsignificant trends were recorded for 501-750 g birth-weight infants. At the other participating center, no significant differences were recorded, cautioning against overgeneralizing these results.

DISCUSSION:

The effects of bilirubin on the auditory pathway in ELBW infants depend on a complex interaction of bilirubin exposure, newborn characteristics, and clinical management.

METHODS:

Aggressive phototherapy was initiated sooner and continued at lower bilirubin levels than conservative phototherapy. A total of 174 ELBW infants were enrolled in the study; 111 infants were successfully tested at 35 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA); 57 died; and 6 were not successfully tested.

PMID:
22289854
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3326602
Free PMC Article

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