Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Jul;74(1):141-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2012.04189.x.

Effects of angiotensin receptor blockers on endothelial nitric oxide release: the role of eNOS variants.

Author information

  • 1Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT:

• Angiotensin II receptor blockers improve endothelial cell-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension through suppression of angiotensin II type 1 receptors but may have additional and differential effects on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function.

WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS:

• The key finding from this study is that angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) differentially enhanced nitric oxide (NO) release in a manner influenced by certain genetic variants of eNOS. This finding provides new insights into the effects of ARBs on endothelial cell-dependent vasodilation and eNOS function that are of high importance in vascular medicine and clinical pharmacology. AIM Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) improve endothelial cell (EC)-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension through suppression of angiotensin II type 1 receptors but may have additional and differential effects on endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) function. To investigate this question, we tested the effects of various ARBs on NO release in ECs from multiple donors, including those with eNOS genetic variants linked to higher cardiovascular risk.

METHODS:

The effects of ARBs (losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan), at 1 µm, on NO release were measured with nanosensors in human umbilical vein ECs obtained from 18 donors. NO release was stimulated with calcium ionophore (1 µm) and its maximal concentration was correlated with eNOS variants. The eNOS variants were determined by a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region (T-786C) and in the exon 7 (G894T), linked to changes in NO metabolism. RESULTS All of the ARBs caused an increase in NO release as compared with untreated samples (P < 0.01, n= 4-5 in all eNOS variants). However, maximal NO production was differentially influenced by eNOS genotype. Olmesartan increased maximal NO release by 30%, which was significantly greater (P < 0.01, n= 4-5 in all eNOS variants) than increases observed with other ARBs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The ARBs differentially enhanced NO release in ECs in a manner influenced by eNOS single nucleotide polymorphisms. These findings provide new insights into the effects of ARBs on EC-dependent vasodilation and eNOS function.

© 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk