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Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Mar;95(3):732-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.023200. Epub 2012 Jan 25.

Green tea consumption and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese: the Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study.

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  • 1Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. y-tomata@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have reported that green tea consumption is associated with a lower risk of diseases that cause functional disability, such as stroke, cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. Although it is expected that green tea consumption would lower the risk of incident functional disability, this has never been investigated directly.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to determine the association between green tea consumption and incident functional disability in elderly individuals.

DESIGN:

We conducted a prospective cohort study in 13,988 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 y. Information on daily green tea consumption and other lifestyle factors was collected via questionnaire in 2006. Data on functional disability were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database, in which subjects were followed up for 3 y. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to investigate the association between green tea consumption and functional disability.

RESULTS:

The 3-y incidence of functional disability was 9.4% (1316 cases). The multiple-adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident functional disability was 0.90 (0.77, 1.06) among respondents who consumed 1-2 cups green tea/d, 0.75 (0.64, 0.88) for those who consumed 3-4 cups/d, and 0.67 (0.57, 0.79) for those who consumed ≥5 cups/d in comparison with those who consumed <1 cup/d (P-trend < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Green tea consumption is significantly associated with a lower risk of incident functional disability, even after adjustment for possible confounding factors.

PMID:
22277550
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3278248
Free PMC Article
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