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BMJ. 2012 Jan 23;344:e363. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e363.

Consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease: Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain. mpilar.guallar@uam.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association between consumption of fried foods and risk of coronary heart disease.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Spanish cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

PARTICIPANTS:

40 757 adults aged 29-69 and free of coronary heart disease at baseline (1992-6), followed up until 2004.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Coronary heart disease events and vital status identified by record linkage with hospital discharge registers, population based registers of myocardial infarction, and mortality registers.

RESULTS:

During a median follow-up of 11 years, 606 coronary heart disease events and 1135 deaths from all causes occurred. Compared with being in the first (lowest) quarter of fried food consumption, the multivariate hazard ratio of coronary heart disease in the second quarter was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.45), in the third quarter was 1.07 (0.83 to 1.38), and in the fourth quarter was 1.08 (0.82 to 1.43; P for trend 0.74). The results did not vary between those who used olive oil for frying and those who used sunflower oil. Likewise, no association was observed between fried food consumption and all cause mortality: multivariate hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest quarter of fried food consumption was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.14; P for trend 0.98).

CONCLUSION:

In Spain, a Mediterranean country where olive or sunflower oil is used for frying, the consumption of fried foods was not associated with coronary heart disease or with all cause mortality.

Comment in

PMID:
22275385
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3265571
Free PMC Article
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