Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Alzheimer Res. 2012 Jun;9(5):563-73.

Alzheimer's disease and environmental exposure to lead: the epidemiologic evidence and potential role of epigenetics.

Author information

  • 1University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, MI, USA.

Abstract

Several lines of evidence indicate that the etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is complex, with significant contributions from both genes and environmental factors. Recent research suggests the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in defining the relationship between environmental exposures and LOAD. In epidemiologic studies of adults, cumulative lifetime lead (Pb) exposure has been associated with accelerated declines in cognition. In addition, research in animal models suggests a causal association between Pb exposure during early life, epigenetics, and LOAD. There are multiple challenges to human epidemiologic research evaluating the relationship between epigenetics, LOAD, and Pb exposure. Epidemiologic studies are not well-suited to accommodate the long latency period between exposures during early life and onset of Alzheimer's disease. There is also a lack of validated circulating epigenetics biomarkers and retrospective biomarkers of Pb exposure. Members of our research group have shown bone Pb is an accurate measurement of historical Pb exposure in adults, offering an avenue for future epidemiologic studies. However, this would not address the risk of LOAD attributable to early-life Pb exposures. Future studies that use a cohort design to measure both Pb exposure and validated epigenetic biomarkers of LOAD will be useful to clarify this important relationship.

PMID:
22272628
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3567843
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Fig. (1)
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Bentham Science Publishers Ltd. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk