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Sex Transm Dis. 2012 Feb;39(2):92-6. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31823e2ff7.

Chlamydia trachomatis trends in the United States among persons 14 to 39 years of age, 1999-2008.

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  • 1National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We report the first population-based assessment of national trends in chlamydia prevalence in the United States.

METHODS:

We investigated trends in chlamydia prevalence in representative samples of the U.S. population aged 14 to 39 years using data from five 2-year survey cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2008. Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported stratified by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Percent change in prevalence over this time period was estimated from regression models.

RESULTS:

In the 2007-2008 cycle, chlamydia prevalence among participants aged 14 to 39 years was 1.6% (95% CI: 1.1%-2.4%). Prevalence was higher among females (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.4%-3.4%) than males (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.7%-1.7%). Prevalence among non-Hispanic black persons was 6.7% (95% CI: 4.6%-9.9%) and was 2.5% (95% CI: 1.6%-3.8%) among adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. Over the five 2-year cycles, there was an estimated 40% reduction (95% CI: 8%-61%) in prevalence among participants aged 14 to 39 years. Decreases in prevalence were notable in men (53% reduction, 95% CI: 19%-72%), adolescents aged 14 to 19 years (48% reduction, 95% CI: 11%-70%), and adolescent non-Hispanic black persons (45%, reduction, 95% CI: 4%-70%). There was no change in prevalence among females aged 14 to 25 years, the population targeted for routine annual screening.

CONCLUSIONS:

On the basis of population estimates of chlamydia prevalence, the overall chlamydia burden in the United States decreased from 1999 to 2008. However, there remains a need to reduce prevalence in populations most at risk and to reduce racial disparities.

PMID:
22249296
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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