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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Feb;97(2):E213-7. doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-2882. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Long-term mortality and causes of death in isolated GHD, ISS, and SGA patients treated with recombinant growth hormone during childhood in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Sweden: preliminary report of 3 countries participating in the EU SAGhE study.

Author information

  • 1Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Karolinska University Hospital Q2:08, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. lars.savendahl@ki.se

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The long-term mortality in adults treated with recombinant GH during childhood has been poorly investigated. Recently released data from the French part of the European Union Safety and Appropriateness of GH treatments in Europe (EU SAGhE) study have raised concerns on the long-term safety of GH treatment.

OBJECTIVE:

To report preliminary data on long-term vital status and causes of death in patients with isolated GH deficiency or idiopathic short stature or born small for gestational age treated with GH during childhood, in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Sweden.

DESIGN:

Data were retrieved from national registries of GH-treated patients and vital status from National Population Registries. Causes of death were retrieved from a National Cause of Death Register (Sweden), Federal and Regional Death Registries (Belgium), or individual patient records (The Netherlands).

PATIENTS:

All patients diagnosed with isolated GH deficiency or idiopathic short stature or born small for gestational age started on recombinant GH during childhood from 1985-1997 and who had attained 18 yr of age by the end of 2010 were included. Vital status was available for approximately 98% of these 2,543 patients, corresponding to 46,556 person-years of observation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Vital status, causes of death, age at death, year of death, duration of GH treatment, and mean GH dose during treatment were assessed.

RESULTS:

Among 21 deaths identified, 12 were due to accidents, four were suicides, and one patient each died from pneumonia, endocrine dysfunction, primary cardiomyopathy, deficiency of humoral immunity, and coagulation defect.

CONCLUSIONS:

In these cohorts, the majority of deaths (76%) were caused by accidents or suicides. Importantly, none of the patients died from cancer or from a cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
22238393
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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