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Atherosclerosis. 2012 Mar;221(1):113-7. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.12.015. Epub 2011 Dec 22.

Impaired coronary flow reserve in young patients affected by severe psoriasis.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardiologic, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of psoriasis (Pso) on coronary microvascular function and whether there is a relationship between disease activity scores and coronary blood flow abnormalities.

METHODS:

56 young patients (pts) with Pso (42 M, aged 37±3 years) without clinical evidence of cardiovascular diseases, and 56 controls matched for age and gender were studied. Coronary flow velocity in the left anterior descending coronary artery was detected by transthoracic echocardiography at rest and during adenosine infusion. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was the ratio of hyperaemic diastolic flow velocity (DFV) to resting DFV. A CFR≤2.5 was considered abnormal.

RESULTS:

In pts with Pso, CFR was lower than in controls (3.2±0.9 vs. 3.7±0.7, p=0.02). CFR was abnormal (≤2.5) in 12 pts (22% vs. 0% controls, p<0.0001). Moreover, in pts with CFR≤2.5, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), a clinical score for Pso severity, was higher (11±6 vs. 7±3, p=0.006) compared to pts with CFR>2.5. At multivariable analysis PASI remained the only determinant of CFR≤2.5 (p=0.02).

CONCLUSION:

CFR in young pts with severe Pso without coronary disease is reduced suggesting a coronary microvascular dysfunction, independently related to the severity and extension of Pso. This early microvascular impairment might be hypothesized as the consequence of prolonged and sustained systemic inflammation and might explain the increased cardiovascular risk conferred by Pso.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22236480
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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