Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2012 Jun;55(3):960-72. doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0357). Epub 2012 Jan 9.

Lingual propulsive pressures across consistencies generated by the anteromedian and posteromedian tongue by healthy young adults.

Author information

  • 1Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA. lgingrich@ric.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In the present study, the authors investigated lingual propulsive pressures generated in the normal swallow by the anterior and posterior lingual segments for various consistencies and maximum isometric tasks.

METHOD:

Lingual pressures for saliva, thin, and honey-thick liquid boluses were measured via the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI Medical, Carnation, WA) at both anteromedian and posteromedian lingual segments of 62 healthy participants, ages 18-34 years (30 men, 32 women).

RESULTS:

A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed that all lingual swallowing pressures were significantly greater at the anteromedian segment than at the posteromedian segment. Gender was not a significant factor; however, women exhibited greater swallowing pressures across all conditions. Lingual pressures increased as bolus viscosity increased. No significant interactions existed. Analysis of a subset of 30 participants revealed that men exhibited greater maximal isometric pressure at the anteromedian segment than women, with no significant gender difference at the posteromedian segment. A significantly higher percentage of maximum isometric tongue pressure was exerted by the posteromedian tongue than by the anteromedian tongue.

CONCLUSION:

Findings suggest that greater amplitudes of lingual pressures are generated during normal swallowing at the anteromedian lingual segment; however, a greater percentage of maximum isometric tongue pressure was exerted by the posteromedian lingual segment, suggesting increased effort by the posterior tongue during bolus propulsion.

PMID:
22232400
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk