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Neuropsychologia. 2012 Feb;50(3):390-5. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.12.010. Epub 2011 Dec 28.

Basal ganglia structures differentially contribute to verbal fluency: evidence from Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected adults.

Author information

  • 1UCLA School of Medicine, 760 Westwood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90024, United States. athames@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The basal ganglia (BG) are involved in executive language functions (i.e., verbal fluency) through their connections with cortical structures. The caudate and putamen receive separate inputs from prefrontal and premotor cortices, and may differentially contribute to verbal fluency performance. We examined BG integrity in relation to lexico-semantic verbal fluency performance among older HIV infected adults.

METHOD:

20 older (50+ years) HIV+ adults underwent MRI and were administered measures of semantic and phonemic fluency. BG (caudate, putamen) regions of interest were extracted.

RESULTS:

Performance on phonemic word generation significantly predicted caudate volume, whereas performance on phonemic switching predicted putamen volume.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest a double dissociation of BG involvement in verbal fluency tasks with the caudate subserving word generation and the putamen associated with switching. As such, verbal fluency tasks appear to be selective to BG function.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22223078
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3608185
Free PMC Article

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