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Sensors (Basel). 2010;10(6):6195-240. doi: 10.3390/s100606195. Epub 2010 Jun 21.

Glucose signaling-mediated coordination of cell growth and cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Author information

  • 1Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universit√† di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 2-20126 Milano, Italy. stefano.busti@unimib.it

Abstract

Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module), the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase) is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

KEYWORDS:

PKA; Rgt2/Snf3; Snf1; cAMP; cell cycle; glucose sensing; yeast

PMID:
22219709
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3247754
Free PMC Article

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