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J Oncol Pract. 2011 Sep;7(5):309-13. doi: 10.1200/JOP.2010.000096. Epub 2011 Jul 27.

Role of axillary staging in women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion.

Author information

  • 1Don and Erika Wallace Comprehensive Breast Program, Department of Women's Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Axillary staging via sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion (DCISM) is routinely performed but remains controversial with regard to the risk-benefit ratio.

METHODS:

Retrospective single-institution review of patients with diagnosis of DCISM (invasive tumor ≤ 0.1 cm). Age, clinicopathologic data, and follow-up were recorded.

RESULTS:

Of 90 patients, 33% were diagnosed by core needle biopsy (CNB), 37% by excisional biopsy, and 29% were upstaged from DCIS on CNB to DCISM at final operation. Three (10%) of 30 patients with DCISM on CNB were upstaged to invasive cancer on final pathology. Median age at diagnosis was 58.9 years (range: 30-89). Lumpectomy was performed in 45% of patients and mastectomy in 55%. Mean number of sentinel nodes was 2.59 (SE 0.17). Six (6.9%) of 87 patients with DCISM as final diagnosis had a positive SLNB (four lumpectomies, two mastectomies). There was no correlation with any clinicopathologic features, including palpable DCIS, DCIS grade/necrosis, or age at diagnosis. All six SLNB-positive patients had a complete axillary dissection; two had additional disease. Median follow-up time was 74.2 months (range: 2-169). In-breast recurrence was seen in three patients (5%), regardless of SLN status, DCIS grade, or necrosis. Two patients developed distant metastasis. Overall survival was 94.19% at 5 years for DCISM and 100% for DCISM with nodal disease.

CONCLUSION:

DCISM comprises 0.6% of breast cancer diagnoses at our institution. There is a low likelihood of nodal spread; however, a lack of identifiable clinicopathologic features associated with a positive SLNB limits selective SLNB use.

PMID:
22211128
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3170064
Free PMC Article

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