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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Mar;97(3):E409-13. doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-2544. Epub 2011 Dec 28.

Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults is phenotypically similar to type 1 diabetes in a minority population.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine, 1000 West Carson Street, Torrance, California 90509, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA) is a form of autoimmune diabetes that has been classified as part of type 1 diabetes or as a distinct clinical entity. Its precise place as a disease category is therefore controversial.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to further examine this issue by comparing the phenotypes of LADA and type 1 diabetes in a predominately minority population.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We studied 126 subjects who were anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive in two separate studies--63 subjects in an outpatient study (study 1), and 63 inpatients after resolution of ketoacidosis (study 2). Clinical and biochemical phenotyping was performed in all patients in each group.

RESULTS:

Few significant differences were found in the clinical or biochemical phenotypes in patients classified as LADA when compared with type 1 diabetes. Adiposity, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, fasting plasma C-peptide, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were all similar. The only distinguishing feature was a history of hypertension (study 1) or systolic blood pressure (study 2). Also, a history of ketoacidosis did not influence the phenotype of LADA in the outpatients in any discernable way.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that LADA and type 1 diabetes are phenotypically indistinguishable in this predominantly minority population with a mean duration of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive diabetes of about 8 yr.

PMID:
22205710
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3319221
Free PMC Article
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