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Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Apr;120(4):535-40. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1104017. Epub 2011 Dec 21.

Environmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and p,p'-DDE and sperm sex-chromosome disomy.

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  • 1Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chromosomal abnormalities contribute substantially to reproductive problems, but the role of environmental risk factors has received little attention.

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated the association of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) exposures with sperm sex-chromosome disomy.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 192 men from subfertile couples. We used multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 to determine XX, YY, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei. Serum was analyzed for concentrations of 57 PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE. Poisson regression models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for disomy by exposure quartiles, controlling for demographic characteristics and semen parameters.

RESULTS:

The median percent disomy was 0.3 for XX and YY, 0.9 for XY, and 1.6 for total sex-chromosome disomy. We observed a significant trend of increasing IRRs for increasing quartiles of p,p'-DDE in XX, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy, and a significant trend of increasing IRRs for increasing quartiles of PCBs for XY and total sex-chromosome disomy; however, there was a significant inverse association for XX disomy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that exposure to p,p'-DDE may be associated with increased rates of XX, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy, whereas exposure to PCBs may be associated with increased rates of YY, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy. In addition, we observed an inverse association between increased exposure to PCBs and XX disomy. Further work is needed to confirm these findings.

PMID:
22189045
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3339457
Free PMC Article
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