Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychol Sci. 2012 Jan 1;23(1):36-40. doi: 10.1177/0956797611422915. Epub 2011 Dec 14.

Living large: the powerful overestimate their own height.

Author information

  • 1Washington University, 1 Brookings Dr., Campus Box 1133, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. duguid@wustl.edu

Abstract

In three experiments, we tested the prediction that individuals' experience of power influences their perceptions of their own height. High power, relative to low power, was associated with smaller estimates of a pole's height relative to the self (Experiment 1), with larger estimates of one's own height (Experiment 2), and with choice of a taller avatar to represent the self in a second-life game (Experiment 3). These results emerged regardless of whether power was experientially primed (Experiments 1 and 3) or manipulated through assigned roles (Experiment 2). Although a great deal of research has shown that more physically imposing individuals are more likely to acquire power, this work is the first to show that powerful people feel taller than they are. The discussion considers the implications for existing and future research on the physical experience of power.

PMID:
22173738
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk