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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2012 Jan 6;417(1):376-81. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.11.121. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Direct central nervous system delivery provides enhanced protection following vector mediated gene replacement in a severe model of spinal muscular atrophy.

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  • 1Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.

Abstract

Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by the homozygous loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). SMA, however, is not due to complete absence of SMN, rather a low level of functional full-length SMN is produced by a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2. Despite SMN's ubiquitous expression, motor neurons are preferentially affected by low SMN levels. Recently gene replacement strategies have shown tremendous promise in animal models of SMA. In this study, we used self-complementary Adeno Associated Virus (scAAV) expressing full-length SMN cDNA to compare two different routes of viral delivery in a severe SMA mouse model. This was accomplished by injecting scAAV9-SMN vector intravenously (IV) or intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into SMA mice. Both routes of delivery resulted in a significant increase in lifespan and weight compared to untreated mice with a subpopulation of mice surviving more than 200days. However, the ICV injected mice gained significantly more weight than their IV treated counterparts. Likewise, survival analysis showed that ICV treated mice displayed fewer early deaths than IV treated animals. Collectively, this report demonstrates that route of delivery is a crucial component of gene therapy treatment for SMA.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22172949
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3259227
Free PMC Article

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