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Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jan;95(1):3-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.019372. Epub 2011 Dec 14.

Effects of breastfeeding and low sugar-sweetened beverage intake on obesity prevalence in Hispanic toddlers.

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  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA. jaimieda@usc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have examined the independent and additive effects of breastfeeding (BF) and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake in early life on overweight and obesity prevalence.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to assess the effects of BF and SSB intake on the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Hispanic toddlers.

DESIGN:

Nutrition data were collected via phone surveys with caregivers of 1483 Hispanic children (2-4 y of age) from the Los Angeles County Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program. BF history at 2-4 y of age was categorized as follows: no BF, >1 wk to <6 mo BF, 6 to <12 mo BF, and ≥12 mo BF. SSB intake at 2-4 y of age was categorized as follows: high SSB (≥2 SSBs/d), mid SSB (1 SSB/d), and no SSB. The height and weight of the children were measured by WIC staff and stored in the Integrated Statewide Information System. Binary logistic regressions assessed the effects of BF and SSB categories on overweight and obesity prevalence.

RESULTS:

In comparison with the no-BF participants, the odds of obesity were lower in the ≥12-mo-BF participants (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.83; P = 0.004). In comparison with high-SSB participants, the odds of obesity were lower in the no-SSB participants (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.47, 1.00; P = 0.047). In comparison with the combined no-BF/high-SSB participants, the odds of obesity were lower in the ≥12-mo BF/no-SSB participants (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.80; P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that BF for ≥1 y and low SSB intake during the toddler years can have profound effects on reducing the prevalence of obesity in Hispanic toddlers.

PMID:
22170357
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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