Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Br J Pharmacol. 2012 May;166(2):788-800. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01815.x.

Inhibitory effects of dopamine on spinal synaptic transmission via dopamine D1-like receptors in neonatal rats.

Author information

  • 1Laboratories of Pharmacology Toxicology, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Dopamine released from the endings of descending dopaminergic nerve fibres in the spinal cord may be involved in modulating functions such as locomotion and nociception. Here, we examined the effects of dopamine on spinal synaptic transmissions in rats.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH:

Spinal reflex potentials, monosynaptic reflex potential (MSR) and slow ventral root potential (sVRP), were measured in the isolated spinal cord of the neonatal rat. Dopamine release was measured by HPLC.

KEY RESULTS:

Dopamine at lower concentrations (<1 µM) depressed sVRP, which is a C fibre-evoked polysynaptic response and believed to reflect nociceptive transmission. At higher concentrations (>1 µM), in addition to a potent sVRP depression, dopamine depolarized baseline potential and slightly depressed MSR. Depression of sVRP by dopamine was partially reversed by dopamine D(1) -like but not by D(2) -like receptor antagonists. SKF83959 and SKF81297, D(1) -like receptor agonists, and methamphetamine, an endogenous dopamine releaser, also caused the inhibition of sVRP. Methamphetamine also depressed MSR, which was inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist. Methamphetamine induced the release of dopamine and 5-HT from spinal cords, indicating that the release of endogenous dopamine and 5-HT depresses sVRP and MSR respectively.

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

These results suggested that dopamine at lower concentrations preferentially inhibited sVRP, which is mediated via dopamine D(1) -like and other unidentified receptors. The dopamine-evoked depression is involved in modulating the spinal functions by the descending dopaminergic pathways.

© 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

PMID:
22168428
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3417505
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (11)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk