Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2012 Jul;37(7):970-9. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2011.11.004. Epub 2011 Dec 9.

Cumulative stress and maternal prenatal corticotropin-releasing hormone in an urban U.S. cohort.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. alison.c.tse@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To date, there have been conflicting reports of the association of psychosocial stressors with prenatal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) levels.

METHODS:

We examined whether racial discrimination, community violence, interpersonal violence (IPV), negative life events, considered independently, and as a composite measure of cumulative stress, were associated with prenatal CRH levels in the Asthma Coalition on Community, Environment, and Social Stress (ACCESS) project, a multiethnic pre-birth cohort in urban Boston. Blood was collected between 20 and 37 weeks gestation (Mean=28.1, SD=4.6 weeks gestation). During pregnancy, women were administered the Conflict Tactics Scale survey to assess IPV, the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey to assess negative life events, the My Exposure to Violence survey to assess community violence, and the Experiences of Discrimination survey. A cumulative stress measure was derived from these instruments to characterize exposure to high levels of multiple stressors.

RESULTS:

None of the individual stressors or cumulative stress was associated with CRH in combined analyses including Whites (n=20), Blacks (n=46), and Hispanics (n=110). In separate analyses of Blacks and Hispanics, racial discrimination, community violence, and cumulative stress were associated with CRH in Blacks, but were not associated with CRH in Hispanics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Though these results require replication, they suggest that the effects of stress on prenatal CRH levels may be mediated by factors that differ between racial/ethnic groups. Further studies in larger samples are warranted to clarify whether associations of chronic stressors and prenatal CRH levels differ by race/ethnicity and to better understand underlying mechanisms.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22154479
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3400107
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Figure 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk