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PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27533. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0027533. Epub 2011 Nov 30.

Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America. parya.saberi@ucsf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive). Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

PMID:
22140446
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3227571
Free PMC Article

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