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Eur Spine J. 2012 May;21(5):897-904. doi: 10.1007/s00586-011-2093-y. Epub 2011 Dec 3.

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours of the spine: clinical manifestations, classification, treatment, and prognostic factors.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedics, Peking University Third Hospital, No 49. North Garden Street, HaiDian District, Beijing 100191, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

To summarise our experience treating patients with spinal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs).

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients diagnosed with spinal MPNSTs who received surgical treatment from January 1998 to December 2009.

RESULTS:

Postoperative follow-up data were available for 14/16 patients with spinal MPNSTs (7 men, 7 women; median age = 44 years [range: 23-68 years]). Eight of 14 (57.1%) patients had primary and 6/14 (42.9%) recurrent MPNSTs. A total of 12/14 (85.7%) patients underwent total tumour resection, whereas 2/14 (14.3%) patients underwent subtotal tumour resection. Malignancies were graded low in 4 (28.6%) and high in 10 (71.1%) cases. A total of 12/14 (85.7%) patients experienced tumour recurrence and 10/14 (71.4%) patients died during the course of follow-up. The 0.5- 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 64.3, 48.2, 32.1, and 21.4%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly associated with tumour malignant degree (P = 0.012).

CONCLUSION:

Diagnosis of spinal MPNSTs should be made with reference to clinical, radiological, and pathological findings. Surgical resection is the best available option for treating spinal MPNST; however, postoperative prognosis is poor.

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