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Public Health. 2012 Jan;126(1):33-9. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.09.027. Epub 2011 Dec 2.

Risk factors for injury in a national cohort of 87,134 Thai adults.

Author information

  • 1National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. vasoontara.yieng@anu.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Information is needed regarding risk factors associated with injury. In middle- and lower-income countries, injury studies have focused on road traffic injuries and less attention has been given to other types of injuries.

METHODS:

This study is part of overarching health-risk transition research in Thailand with a large national cohort study that began in 2005 (n = 87,134). Associations between potential determinants and overall injury were measured, as well as injury by location (transport, home, work and sport), using data gathered from the baseline questionnaire.

RESULTS:

In total, 21.5% of the cohort reported at least one incidence of injury over the last 12 months. Risk factors associated with injury were being male [odds ratio (OR) 1.20], having lower income (OR 1.70), having problems with vision (OR 1.46), having epilepsy (OR 3.02), having depression/anxiety (OR 1.62), poor self-assessed health (OR 1.68), being obese (OR 1.24) and death of father due to injury (OR 1.59). Analysis of injury by location provided more specific information on risk factors. For example, females were more likely to report injuries at home, while males, urban residents and regular alcohol drinkers were more likely to report transport injuries.

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk of injury in Thailand varies considerably by location, sociodemographic group and several categories of co-existing morbidities. Such epidemiological information identifying risk factors for injury is useful for designing targeted injury prevention programmes in Thailand and other middle-income countries.

Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22137094
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3267036
Free PMC Article
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