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Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2011;4:353-69. doi: 10.2147/DMSO.S24022. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

Management of diabetes across the course of disease: minimizing obesity-associated complications.

Author information

  • Medicine and Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine; Nutrition and Weight Management Center; and Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Obesity increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this in turn correlates with an elevated probability of long-term diabetes complications once diabetes is established. Interventions aimed at lowering weight via changes in diet and lifestyle have repeatedly been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM and even to reverse early disease. Weight gain, a potential side effect of treatment for patients with T2DM, is also an important concern, and it has been noted that weight increases associated with antidiabetes therapy may blunt cardiovascular risk reductions achieved by decreasing blood glucose. Among older agents, metformin and acarbose have the lowest risk for weight gain, while sulfonylureas, meglitinides, and thiazolidinediones are all associated with weight increases. Clinical trial results have also consistently demonstrated that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylin lowers weight, and that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral in patients with T2DM. Conventional human insulin formulations are known to increase weight in patients with T2DM. However, some insulin analogs, particularly insulin detemir, have lower liability for this adverse event. The use of both pharmacologic and surgical therapies aimed at treating obesity rather than lowering blood glucose have the potential to improve glycemic control and even resolve T2DM in some patients.

KEYWORDS:

bariatric; diabetes; incretin; insulin; obesity; oral antidiabetes agents

PMID:
22135499
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3224657
Free PMC Article

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