Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Rehabil Psychol. 2011 Nov;56(4):257-66. doi: 10.1037/a0025577.

Testing two types of self-help CBT-I for insomnia in older adults with arthritis or coronary artery disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23284-2018, USA. bdrybarczyk@vcu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present study tested two methods of self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for 106 older adults (mean age = 68) with osteoarthritis (n = 33) or coronary artery disease (n = 33) or no significant medical condition (n = 40). The latter was employed as a comparison group to test the differential efficacy between primary and comorbid insomnia.

METHOD:

Self-help CBT-I has demonstrated efficacy in previous studies, so two treatments were compared rather than employing a no treatment control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a book version or an enhanced multimedia version of CBT-I.

RESULTS:

Both versions of CBT-I demonstrated efficacy in improving all measures of sleep at posttreatment, using intent-to-treat analyses. These sleep improvements were maintained among 86 treatment completers who participated in 1-year follow-up assessment. There were no significant differences in treatment response between primary (no medical condition) and comorbid insomnia participants and no significant differences between the two types of self-help according to sleep log measure. However, multimedia participants compared to book participants showed more improvement on three global sleep measures administered at posttreatment only.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although outcomes were attenuated relative to those obtained in therapist led intervention studies, the results suggest that self-help CBT-I has good potential to serve as a first-line, cost-effective treatment for both primary and comorbid insomnia in older adults.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for American Psychological Association
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk