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Psychother Psychosom. 2012;81(1):38-43. doi: 10.1159/000329700. Epub 2011 Nov 22.

Higher executive control and visual memory performance predict treatment completion in borderline personality disorder.

Author information

  • 1Subprogram in Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, City University of New York, New York 10031, USA. efertuck@ccny.cuny.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Non-completion of a prescribed course of treatment occurs in 20-60% of individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD). While symptom severity, personality traits and environmental factors have been implicated as predictors of treatment non-completion (TNC), there have been no studies of neuropsychological predictors in this population.

METHODS:

From a randomized controlled trial, a subsample of 31, unmedicated outpatients diagnosed with BPD with recent self-injurious behavior was assessed on 5 neuropsychological domains. Patients were also assessed for general IQ, demographic and other salient clinical variables. Patients were randomized to one of four treatment conditions, which lasted up to 1 year. Number of weeks in treatment (WIT) up to 1 year was utilized as the index of TNC.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three percent of the subsample (n = 12) did not complete 1 year of treatment. However, more WIT were predicted by better baseline executive control (Trails B; p < 0.01) and visual memory performance (Benton visual retention; p < 0.001); other neuropsychological domains did not predict WIT.

CONCLUSION:

In the treatment of outpatients with BPD, better executive control and visual memory performance predict more WIT. Assessing and addressing these neurocognitive factors in treatment may reduce TNC in this high-risk population.

Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID:
22116411
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3242704
Free PMC Article
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