Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct 28;17(40):4509-16. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i40.4509.

Helicobacter pylori infection in bleeding peptic ulcer patients after non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug consumption.

Author information

  • 1Complex Operating Unit of Gastroenterology, AORN A Cardarelli, 80131 Napoli, Italy. manguso@alice.it

Abstract

AIM:

To establish the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer after consumption of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

METHODS:

A very early upper endoscopy was performed to find the source of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to take biopsy specimens for analysis of H. pylori infection by the rapid urease (CLO) test, histological examination, and bacterial culture. IgG anti-CagA were also sought. The gold standard for identifying H. pylori infection was positive culture of biopsy specimens or contemporary positivity of the CLO test and the presence of H. pylori on tissue sections.

RESULTS:

Eighty patients, 61 males (76.3%), mean age 61.2 ± 15.9 years, were consecutively enrolled. Forty-seven (58.8%) patients occasionally consumed NSAIDs, while 33 (41.3%) were on chronic treatment with low-dose aspirin (LD ASA). Forty-four (55.0%) patients were considered infected by H. pylori. The infection rate was not different between patients who occasionally or chronically consumed NSAIDs. The culture of biopsy specimens had a sensitivity of 86.4% and a specificity of 100%; corresponding figures for histological analysis were 65.9% and 77.8%, for the CLO test were 68.2% and 75%, for the combined use of histology and the CLO test were 56.8% and 100%, and for IgG anti-CagA were 90% and 98%. The highest accuracy (92.5%) was obtained with the culture of biopsy specimens.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer after NSAID/LD ASA consumption frequently have H. pylori infection. Biopsy specimen culture after an early upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy seems the most efficient test to detect this infection.

KEYWORDS:

Endoscopy; Helicobacter pylori; Helicobacter pylori infection; Low-dose aspirin; Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs; Peptic ulcer hemorrhage

PMID:
22110282
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3218142
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk