Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Jan 1;54(1):1-7. doi: 10.1093/cid/cir773. Epub 2011 Nov 21.

Using high-technology to enforce low-technology safety measures: the use of third-party remote video auditing and real-time feedback in healthcare.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hand hygiene is a key measure in preventing infections. We evaluated healthcare worker (HCW) hand hygiene with the use of remote video auditing with and without feedback.

METHODS:

The study was conducted in an 17-bed intensive care unit from June 2008 through June 2010. We placed cameras with views of every sink and hand sanitizer dispenser to record hand hygiene of HCWs. Sensors in doorways identified when an individual(s) entered/exited. When video auditors observed a HCW performing hand hygiene upon entering/exiting, they assigned a pass; if not, a fail was assigned. Hand hygiene was measured during a 16-week period of remote video auditing without feedback and a 91-week period with feedback of data. Performance feedback was continuously displayed on electronic boards mounted within the hallways, and summary reports were delivered to supervisors by electronic mail.

RESULTS:

During the 16-week prefeedback period, hand hygiene rates were less than 10% (3933/60 542) and in the 16-week postfeedback period it was 81.6% (59 627/73 080). The increase was maintained through 75 weeks at 87.9% (262 826/298 860).

CONCLUSIONS:

The data suggest that remote video auditing combined with feedback produced a significant and sustained improvement in hand hygiene.

Comment in

PMID:
22109950
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk