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Toxicology. 2012 Jan 27;291(1-3):83-92. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2011.11.001. Epub 2011 Nov 15.

Neurodevelopmental low-dose bisphenol A exposure leads to early life-stage hyperactivity and learning deficits in adult zebrafish.

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  • 1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97333, USA.

Abstract

Developmental bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been implicated in adverse behavior and learning deficits. The mode of action underlying these effects is unclear. The objectives of this study were to identify whether low-dose, developmental BPA exposure affects larval zebrafish locomotor behavior and whether learning deficits occur in adults exposed during development. Two control compounds, 17β-estradiol (an estrogen receptor ligand) and GSK4716 (a synthetic estrogen-related receptor gamma ligand), were included. Larval toxicity assays were used to determine appropriate BPA, 17β-estradiol, and GSK4716 concentrations for behavior testing. BPA tissue uptake was analyzed using HPLC and lower doses were extrapolated using a linear regression analysis. Larval behavior tests were conducted using a ViewPoint Zebrabox. Adult learning tests were conducted using a custom-built T-maze. BPA exposure to <30μM was non-teratogenic. Neurodevelopmental BPA exposure to 0.01, 0.1, or 1μM led to larval hyperactivity or learning deficits in adult zebrafish. Exposure to 0.1μM 17β-estradiol or GSK4716 also led to larval hyperactivity. This study demonstrates the efficacy of using the zebrafish model for studying the neurobehavioral effects of low-dose developmental BPA exposure.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22108044
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3245816
Free PMC Article
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