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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2012 Feb 1;59(2):149-54. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e318240566b.

Effects of hepatitis C and HIV on cognition in women: data from the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. howard.crystal@downstate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare neuropsychological scores in women infected with HIV, women infected with both HIV and hepatitis C, and uninfected subjects.

BACKGROUND:

Some, but not all, studies have demonstrated that dual infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV has worse effects on cognition than infection with HIV alone.

DESIGN/METHODS:

The Women's Interagency HIV Study is an ongoing prospective study of the natural history of HIV in women where participants are reevaluated every 6 months. In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the effects of active HIV and HCV infections on scores on symbol-digit modalities test, the Stroop interference test, and trails A and B after controlling for age, ethnicity, education, depression, liver disease, and current or past substance abuse.

RESULTS:

Data were available for 1338 women-17.8 % had detectable hepatitis C virus and 67% were HIV seropositive. In fully adjusted general linear models, HCV viremia was not associated with scores on any of the cognitive tests.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large sample of women, active HCV infection was not associated with scores on a small battery of neuropsychological tests.

PMID:
22107817
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3319079
Free PMC Article
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