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J Res Med Sci. 2011 Mar;16(3):297-302.

Effect of soy phytoestrogen on metabolic and hormonal disturbance of women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Phytoestrogens are a group of plants derived compounds with weekly estrogen effect that appear to have protective effects on metabolic and hormonal abnormalities of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). So the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of soy phytoestrogens on reproductive hormones and lipid profiles in PCOS women.

METHODS:

In this quasi-randomized trial, 146 subjects with PCOS were divided into two groups; the experimental group who received Genistein (Bergamon, Italy) 18 mg twice a day orally and the control group that received similar capsules with cellulose for 3 months. Hormonal features and lipid profiles were measured before and after 3 months of supplement therapy.

RESULTS:

After 3 months of supplement therapy there were no statistically significant differences in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) serum levels in Genistein and placebo group before and after treatment; however serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), dehydroepiandrostrone sulfate (DHEAS) and testosterone were significantly decreased after 3 months therapy in Genistein group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Genistein consumption may prevent cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in PCOS patients by improving their reproductive hormonal and lipid profiles.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular Diseases; Genistein; Phytoestrogens; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

PMID:
22091248
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3214337
Free PMC Article
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