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Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2012 Jan-Feb;34(1):27-36. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2011.10.003. Epub 2011 Oct 21.

Waterborne manganese exposure alters plasma, brain, and liver metabolites accompanied by changes in stereotypic behaviors.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170, USA.

Abstract

Overexposure to waterborne manganese (Mn) is linked with cognitive impairment in children and neurochemical abnormalities in other experimental models. In order to characterize the threshold between Mn-exposure and altered neurochemistry, it is important to identify biomarkers that positively correspond with brain Mn-accumulation. The objective of this study was to identify Mn-induced alterations in plasma, liver, and brain metabolites using liquid/gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses; and to monitor corresponding Mn-induced behavior changes. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats had access to deionized drinking water either Mn-free or containing 1g Mn/L for 6 weeks. Behaviors were monitored during the sixth week for a continuous 24h period while in a home cage environment using video surveillance. Mn-exposure significantly increased liver, plasma, and brain Mn concentrations compared to control, specifically targeting the globus pallidus (GP). Mn significantly altered 98 metabolites in the brain, liver, and plasma; notably shifting cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the brain (increased oleic and palmitic acid; 12.57 and 15.48 fold change (FC), respectively), and liver (increased oleic acid, 14.51 FC; decreased hydroxybutyric acid, -14.29 FC). Additionally, Mn-altered plasma metabolites homogentisic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and aspartic acid correlated significantly with GP and striatal Mn. Total distance traveled was significantly increased and positively correlated with Mn-exposure, while nocturnal stereotypic and exploratory behaviors were reduced with Mn-exposure and performed largely during the light cycle compared to unexposed rats. These data provide putative biomarkers for Mn-neurotoxicity and suggest that Mn disrupts the circadian cycle in rats.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22056924
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3268843
Free PMC Article

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