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Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Oct;78(4):237-45.

Brain injury from a first nations' perspective: teachings from elders and traditional healers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, 160-500 University Ave., Toronto, ON, Canada, M5G 1V7. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of knowledge about how cultural ideas affect First Nations peoples' perception of rehabilitation needs and the ability to access services.

PURPOSE:

The study explored the perceptions of treating and healing brain injury from First Nations elders and traditional healers in the communities served by Wassay-Gezhig-Na-Nahn-Dah-We-lgamig (Kenora Area Health Access Centre).

METHODS:

A participatory action approach was used, leading to a focus group with elders and traditional healers. Findings, established through a framework analysis method, were member checked prior to dissemination.

FINDINGS:

Four themes arose from the data: pervasiveness of spirituality, "fixing" illness or injury versus living with wellness, working together in treating brain injury, and financial support needed for traditional healing.

IMPLICATIONS:

Funding is required for traditional healing services to provide culturallysafe and responsive occupational therapy services to First Nations individuals with brain injury.

PMID:
22043555
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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