Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gend Med. 2011 Dec;8(6):388-98. doi: 10.1016/j.genm.2011.07.002. Epub 2011 Oct 28.

Relationship between resting blood pressure and laboratory-induced pain among healthy children.

Author information

  • 1Irvine School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adult studies have demonstrated that increased resting blood pressure (BP) levels correlate with decreased pain sensitivity. However, few studies have examined the relationship between BP and experimental pain sensitivity among children.

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated the association between resting BP levels and experimental pain tolerance, intensity, and unpleasantness in healthy children. We also explored whether these BP-pain relationships were age and gender dependent.

METHODS:

Participants underwent separate 4-trial blocks of cutaneous pressure and thermal pain stimuli, and 1 trial of a cold pain stimulus in counterbalanced order.

RESULTS:

A total of 235 healthy children (49.6% female; mean age 12.7 [2.9] years; age range 8-18 years) participated. The study revealed specific gender-based BP-pain relationships. Girls with higher resting systolic BP levels were found to have lower thermal intensity ratings than girls with lower resting systolic BP levels; this relationship was stronger among adolescent girls than among younger girls. Among young girls (8-11 years), those with higher resting diastolic BP (DBP) levels were found to have lower cold intensity and unpleasantness as well as lower thermal intensity ratings than did young girls with lower resting DBP levels; these DBP-pain response relationships were not seen among adolescent girls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Age, rather than resting BP, was predictive of laboratory pain ratings in boys. The findings suggest that the relationship between BP and experimental pain is age and gender dependent. These aspects of cardiovascular relationships to pain in males and females need further attention to understand their clinical importance.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk