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Prev Med. 2012 Jan;54(1):68-73. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.10.004. Epub 2011 Oct 15.

Interactions between psychosocial and built environment factors in explaining older adults' physical activity.

Author information

  • 1Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health, San Diego State University & University of California, San Diego, 3900 Fifth Avenue, Suite 310, San Diego, CA 92103, USA. jcarlson@projects.sdsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate ecological model predictions of cross-level interactions among psychosocial and environmental correlates of physical activity in 719 community-dwelling older adults in the Baltimore, Maryland and Seattle, Washington areas during 2005-2008.

METHOD:

Walkability, access to parks and recreation facilities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) minutes per week (min/week) were measured objectively. Neighborhood aesthetics, walking facilities, social support, self-efficacy, barriers and transportation and leisure walking min/week were self-reported.

RESULTS:

Walkability interacted with social support in explaining total MVPA (B=13.71) and with social support (B=7.90), self-efficacy (B=7.66) and barriers (B=-8.26) in explaining walking for transportation. Aesthetics interacted with barriers in explaining total MVPA (B=-12.20) and walking facilities interacted with self-efficacy in explaining walking for leisure (B=-10.88; Ps<.05). Summarizing across the interactions, living in a supportive environment (vs. unsupportive) was related to 30-59 more min/week of physical activity for participants with more positive psychosocial attributes, but only 0-28 more min/week for participants with less positive psychosocial attributes.

CONCLUSION:

Results supported synergistic interactions between built environment and psychosocial factors in explaining physical activity among older adults. Findings suggest multilevel interventions may be most effective in increasing physical activity.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22027402
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3254837
Free PMC Article

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