Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Chiropr Med. 2010 Dec;9(4):184-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jcm.2010.08.003. Epub 2010 Oct 15.

A mind-body approach for precompetitive anxiety in power-lifters: 2 case studies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this article is to report how Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) was used for precompetitive anxiety in 2 power-lifting athletes.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

Two athletes (1 elite and 1 novice), who were participating in major competitions within 2 weeks of testing, were assessed for cognitive and somatic anxiety levels pre- and postintervention. Three psychometrics were used to measure mental state (cognitive anxiety): the Sports Competitive Anxiety Test, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and the SF-36v2 Health Survey. To assess somatic anxiety, saliva samples were collected and screened for cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

The intervention was performed by a doctor of chiropractic and consisted of one 30-minute session of NET that focused on the athletes' concerns regarding the upcoming competitions. The results showed reductions in reported subjective anxiety levels and changes in the salivary hormone profile of both athletes following the intervention, with the more remarkable changes occurring in the novice athlete. The reduction in reported cognitive anxiety levels and the change in somatic anxiety markers may be the result of the mind-body intervention. However, these changes may also be attributed to other factors, such as the natural course of anxiety during competition. An experimental trial would be required to determine the effectiveness of NET for reducing precompetitive anxiety of power-lifters.

CONCLUSION:

Neuro Emotional Technique may have helped these power-lifters control emotional arousal and precompetitive anxiety. However, caution is warranted when using these results to draw conclusions or when extrapolating these results to other settings.

Copyright © 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
22027111
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3225233
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk