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J Chiropr Med. 2010 Dec;9(4):166-73. doi: 10.1016/j.jcm.2010.07.003. Epub 2010 Oct 14.

The effect of high-heeled shoes on lumbar lordosis: a narrative review and discussion of the disconnect between Internet content and peer-reviewed literature.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Some women complain of low back pain that they believe is due to wearing high-heeled shoes, and some clinicians seem to think the reason is that high-heeled shoes cause increased lumbar lordosis. This article examines Internet information aimed at the general public and presents a literature review of available research in this area.

METHODS:

The keywords high heels and high-heeled shoes, combined with the words lumbar, lordosis, and pelvic tilt, were used in an Internet search of Ask.com; in published literature searches of PubMed, MANTIS, CINAHL, Scopus, and ProceedingsFirst; and in searches for theses and dissertations of PapersFirst through June 2010.

RESULTS:

There are many Internet sites that support the belief that high-heeled shoes cause increased lordosis. However, published research for this topic mostly does not support this belief; but some mixed results, small subject groups, and questionable methods have left the issue unclear.

CONCLUSIONS:

It appears that some health care providers are offering advice about the effect of high-heeled shoes on lumbar lordosis that conflicts with most published research. However, the prevalence of such advice is unknown; and the published research is equivocal. Considering that both low back pain and the wearing of high heeled-shoes are common, clinicians could use some clearer guidance; this is an area that deserves further investigation.

Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
22027108
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3206568
Free PMC Article

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