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Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Nov;118(5):1074-80. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182329681.

Attitudes and practices of obstetrician-gynecologists regarding influenza vaccination in pregnancy.

Author information

  • 1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. DKissin@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices of obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) regarding vaccination of pregnant women during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

METHODS:

From February to July 2010, a self-administered mail survey was conducted among a random sample of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) members involved in obstetric care. To assess predictors of routinely offering influenza vaccination, adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from survey data.

RESULTS:

Among 3,096 survey recipients, 1,310 (42.3%) responded to the survey, of whom 873 were eligible for participation. The majority of ob-gyns reported routinely offering both seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination to their pregnant patients (77.6% and 85.6%, respectively) during the 2009-2010 season; 21.1% and 13.3% referred patients to other specialists. Reported reasons for not offering vaccination included inadequate reimbursement, storage limitations, or belief that vaccine should be administered by another provider. Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination during the first trimester was not recommended by 10.6% and 9.6% of ob-gyns, respectively. Predictors of routinely offering 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine included: considering primary care and preventive medicine a very important part of practice (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.2, CI 1.01-1.4); observing serious conditions attributed to influenza-like illness (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.1, CI 1.02-1.1); personally receiving 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.2, CI 1.1-1.4); and practicing in multispecialty group (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.1, CI 1.1-1.2). Physicians in solo practice were less likely to routinely offer influenza vaccine (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.8, CI 0.7-0.9).

CONCLUSION:

Although most ob-gyns routinely offered influenza vaccination to pregnant patients, vaccination coverage rates may be improved by addressing logistic and financial challenges of vaccine providers.

PMID:
22015875
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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