Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
J Pregnancy. 2012;2012:508657. doi: 10.1155/2012/508657. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

The impact of HIV on maternal morbidity in the Pre-HAART era in Uganda.

Author information

  • 1ICAP, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, P.O. Box 3567, Kampala, Uganda. hn2158@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare maternal morbidity in HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women.

METHODS:

Major maternal morbidity (severe febrile illness, illnesses requiring hospital admissions, surgical revisions, or illnesses resulting in death) was measured prospectively in a cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected women followed from 36 weeks of pregnancy to 6 weeks after delivery. Odds ratios of major morbidity and associated factors were examined using logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Major morbidity was observed in 46/129 (36%) and 104/390 (27%) of the HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, respectively, who remained in followup. In the multivariable analysis, major morbidity was independently associated with HIV infection, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.7 (1.1 to 2.7), nulliparity (AOR 2.0 (1.3 to 3.0)), and lack of, or minimal, formal education (AOR 2.1 (1.1 to 3.8)).

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV was associated with a 70% increase in the odds of major maternal morbidity in these Ugandan mothers.

PMID:
22013532
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3195496
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Hindawi Publishing Corporation Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk