Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e25558. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025558. Epub 2011 Oct 7.

Protective contributions against invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia of antibody and Th17-cell responses to nasopharyngeal colonisation.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Respiratory Research, Department of Medicine, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The nasopharyngeal commensal bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae is also a frequent cause of serious infections. Nasopharyngeal colonisation with S. pneumoniae inhibits subsequent re-colonisation by inducing Th17-cell adaptive responses, whereas vaccination prevents invasive infections by inducing antibodies to S. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides. In contrast, protection against invasive infection after nasopharyngeal colonisation with mutant S. pneumoniae strains was associated with antibody responses to protein antigens. The role of colonisation-induced Th17-cell responses during subsequent invasive infections is unknown. Using mouse models, we show that previous colonisation with S. pneumoniae protects against subsequent lethal pneumonia mainly by preventing bacteraemia with a more modest effect on local control of infection within the lung. Previous colonisation resulted in CD4-dependent increased levels of Th17-cell cytokines during subsequent infectious challenge. However, mice depleted of CD4 cells prior to challenge remained protected against bacteraemia, whereas no protection was seen in antibody deficient mice and similar protection could be achieved through passive transfer of serum. Serum from colonised mice but not antibody deficient mice promoted phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, and previously colonised mice were able to rapidly clear S. pneumoniae from the blood after intravenous inoculation. Thus, despite priming for a Th17-cell response during subsequent infection, the protective effects of prior colonisation in this model was not dependent on CD4 cells but on rapid clearance of bacteria from the blood by antibody-mediated phagocytosis. These data suggest that whilst nasopharyngeal colonisation induces a range of immune responses, the effective protective responses depend upon the site of subsequent infection.

PMID:
22003400
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3189185
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (8)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk