Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012 Jan-Feb;44(1):12-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2011.02.015. Epub 2011 Oct 13.

Developing a measure of behavior change in a program to help low-income parents prevent unhealthful weight gain in children.

Author information

  • 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. kld12@cornell.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To develop and test a brief measure of changes in eating, active play, and parenting practices after an intervention to help parents shape children's choices and home environments.

DESIGN:

Sequential phases of development and testing: expert panel review, cognitive testing interviews, field testing, test-retest study, and assessment of convergence with detailed previously validated instruments.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), New York State. Low-income parents of 3- to 11-year-old children; Cooperative Extension nutrition and parenting educators.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Questionnaire reliability, validity, respondent comprehension, and feasibility of use in program contexts.

ANALYSIS:

Qualitative analysis of item comprehension. Correlational analysis of test-retest reliability and convergent validity.

RESULTS:

A behavior checklist was developed to assess change in parent-reported family eating, physical activity, and parenting practices addressed by an intervention. The checklist was feasible for use in EFNEP and questions were understood as intended. Test-retest reliability was good (r = 0.83) and scores correlated significantly (range, 0.25 to -0.60; P < .05) with detailed measures of dietary habits, parental modeling, physical activity, and home environment.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Development and testing in a program context produced a tool community nutritionists can use to evaluate educational interventions aimed at helping parents promote healthful eating and activity.

Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21996430
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk