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Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2012 Jun;58(6):905-9. doi: 10.1002/pbc.23349. Epub 2011 Oct 11.

Choroid plexus tumors; management, outcome, and association with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome: the Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) experience, 1991-2010.

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  • 1Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Choroid plexus tumors (CPT) are rare, and predominate in early childhood. An association with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) has been reported, but the biological and clinical implications of this association remain poorly defined. We have investigated the clinical features and overall survival of all CPT patients treated at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) over a 20-year period, with particular attention to the association of CPT with LFS.

METHODS:

A retrospective evaluation of the course of therapy and clinical outcome was undertaken on the 42 patients diagnosed with and treated for CPT at CHLA from January 1991 to December 2010. Any association with multiple primary tumors and family histories consistent with LFS was investigated in all patients.

RESULTS:

Six of the 42 patients (16.7%), demonstrated either phenotypic and/or genotypic characteristics consistent with LFS, with either a distinct family history of cancer, a synchronous diagnosis of a different type of cancer, or the subsequent development of metachronous cancers. Of 11 patients with choroid plexus carcinoma tested for TP53 germline mutations, four (36.4%) were positive. A single patient with a choroid plexus papilloma had phenotypic characteristics of LFS but tested negative for TP53.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with CPC appear to have a high frequency of TP53 germline mutations in association with LFS. This raises the question whether all children with CPC should be tested for TP53 germline mutations in order to institute screening to enhance early detection and treatment of subsequent cancers.

Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
21990040
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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