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Neurology. 2011 Dec 13;77(24):2097-104. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31823648cb. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

Effect of public deliberation on attitudes toward surrogate consent for dementia research.

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  • 1Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the informed, deliberative views of the older general public toward a policy of allowing surrogate consent for Alzheimer disease (AD) research.

METHODS:

A total of 503 persons aged 50+ recruited by random digit dialing were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: deliberation, education, or control. The deliberation group attended an all-day education/peer deliberation session; the education group received written information only. Participants were surveyed at baseline, after deliberation session (or equivalent time), and 1 month after the session, regarding their attitudes toward a policy of allowing surrogate consent for research studies of varying risks and potential benefits (a lumbar puncture study, a drug randomized controlled trial, a vaccine randomized controlled trial, and an early phase gene transfer trial).

RESULTS:

At baseline, a policy of surrogate consent for AD research was supported by 55%-91%, depending on the scenario. The education group had a transient increase in support for one research scenario after receiving the information materials. In the deliberation group, support for surrogate consent was higher after deliberation for all scenarios (67% to 97%), with much of the increase sustained 1 month after the deliberation session. No changes occurred in the control group. The study's limitations include self-selection of participants due to the demanding nature of attendance at the deliberation sessions.

CONCLUSIONS:

This sample of the older general public generally supported a policy of surrogate consent for AD research at baseline. Their support increased with democratic deliberation involving informed, in-depth exploration of the relevant scientific and ethical issues.

PMID:
21975207
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3235352
Free PMC Article
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