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J Med Case Rep. 2011 Oct 4;5:496. doi: 10.1186/1752-1947-5-496.

Manifestation of a sellar hemangioblastoma due to pituitary apoplexy: a case report.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland. ralph.schaer@insel.ch.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Hemangioblastomas are rare, benign tumors occurring in any part of the nervous system. Most are found as sporadic tumors in the cerebellum or spinal cord. However, these neoplasms are also associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. We report a rare case of a sporadic sellar hemangioblastoma that became symptomatic due to pituitary apoplexy.

CASE PRESENTATION:

An 80-year-old, otherwise healthy Caucasian woman presented to our facility with severe headache attacks, hypocortisolism and blurred vision. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an acute hemorrhage of a known, stable and asymptomatic sellar mass lesion with chiasmatic compression accounting for our patient's acute visual impairment. The tumor was resected by a transnasal, transsphenoidal approach and histological examination revealed a capillary hemangioblastoma (World Health Organization grade I). Our patient recovered well and substitutional therapy was started for panhypopituitarism. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scan performed 16 months postoperatively showed good chiasmatic decompression with no tumor recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS:

A review of the literature confirmed supratentorial locations of hemangioblastomas to be very unusual, especially within the sellar region. However, intrasellar hemangioblastoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy.

PMID:
21970745
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3197537
Free PMC Article

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