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J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Oct;111(10):1523-35. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.07.013.

A systematic review of behavioral interventions to promote intake of fruit and vegetables.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. cthomson@u.arizona.edu

Erratum in

  • J Am Diet Assoc. 2012 Feb;112(2):325.

Abstract

Fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake in the United States remains below recommended levels despite evidence of the health benefits of regular consumption. Efforts to increase F/V intake include behavior-based interventions. A systematic review of MEDLINE PubMed and PsycINFO databases (2005-2010) was conducted to identify behavior-based intervention trials designed to promote F/V intake. Using predetermined limits and selection criteria, 34 studies were identified for inclusion. Behavior-based interventions resulted in an average increase in F/V intake of +1.13 and +0.39 servings per day in adults and children, respectively. Interventions involving minority adults or low-income participants demonstrated average increases in daily F/V consumption of +0.97 servings/day, whereas worksite interventions averaged +0.8 servings/day. Achieving and sustaining F/V intake at recommended levels of intake across the population cannot be achieved through behavior-based interventions alone. Thus, efforts to combine these interventions with other approaches including social marketing, behavioral economics approaches, and technology-based behavior change models should be tested to ensure goals are met and sustained.

Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21963019
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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