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Addict Behav. 2012 Jan;37(1):73-7. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.09.001. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

Social-environmental factors related to prenatal smoking.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, USA. ghomish@buffalo.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is a significant public health issue that has profound effects on maternal and fetal health. Although many women stop smoking upon pregnancy recognition, a large number continue. Given the higher burden of smoking among low-income women, the focus of this study is to examine the impact of pre-conception social-environmental influences on smoking cessation during the first trimester of pregnancy.

METHODS:

Pregnant women who presented for prenatal were asked to complete a screening form at their first prenatal appointment. Women who agreed to participate were scheduled for a total of four interviews; a prenatal interview at the end of each trimester and a postnatal interview at 2 months of infant age. The sample for the current report consisted of pregnant women (first trimester) with a partner (N=316).

RESULTS:

After controlling for pre-conception heaviness of smoking, a number of social-environmental factors were associated with smoking during the first trimester. Women were more likely to smoke during the first trimester if their partner was a smoker; however, the presence of other household smokers was not associated with increased risk for smoking. Additionally, women with a greater proportion of friends (but not relatives) who smoked and more frequent exposure to environmental tobacco were more likely to smoke.

CONCLUSIONS:

This work found differential impacts of the social network on smoking suggesting that understanding relationship type, not simply number of smokers, may be important for smoking cessation efforts. Understanding differences in social network influences on smoking can help to inform interventions.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21945011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3201815
Free PMC Article
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