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J Electrocardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;44(6):626-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2011.08.010. Epub 2011 Sep 19.

Spatiotemporal control of heart rate in a rabbit heart.

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  • 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St Louis, MO 63130, USA.

Abstract

Sinoatrial node is responsible for the origin of the wave of excitation, which spreads throughout the heart and orchestrates cardiac contraction via calcium-mediated excitation-contraction coupling. P wave represents the spread of excitation in the atria. It is well known that the autonomic nervous system controls the heart rate by dynamically altering both cellular ionic fluxes and the anatomical location of the leading pacemaker. In this study, we used isolated rabbit right atria and mathematical model of the pacemaker region of the rabbit heart. Application of isoproterenol resulted in dose-dependent acceleration of the heart rate and superior shift of the leading pacemaker. In the mathematical model, such behavior could be reproduced by a gradient of expression in β1-adrenergic receptors along the superior-inferior axis. Application of acetylcholine resulted in preferentially inferior shift of pacemaker and slowing of the heart rate. The mathematical model reproduced this behavior with imposing a gradient of expression of acetylcholine-sensitive potassium channel. We conclude that anatomical shift of the leading pacemaker in the rabbit heart could be achieved through gradient of expression of β1-adrenergic receptors and I(K,ACh).

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21937057
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3220935
Free PMC Article

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